Country Style Cars

A Brief History of our 1957 & 1958 Rolls Royce Silver Clouds

Rolls Royce is a name synonymous with style and elegance; the cars made by this company are renowned for their luxurious nature as well as the quality of their design and manufacture. Over the years this model from Rolls Royce has developed into the ideal and traditional wedding car.

Classic 1950’s Rolls Royce Silver Cloud were hand built by Rolls Royce, the Rolls Royce Silver Cloud 1 was introduced in April 1955 in an era when craftsmanship and styling were at their very height. The Rolls Royce Silver Cloud I has a six cylinder 4.9 litre engine which gives the car a top-speed of 130 mph, and an acceleration of 0-60 mph in 13 seconds. Rolls Royce Silver Clouds were limited in numbers due to production capacity, manufacturing of these models stopped in 1965.

Rolls Royce and Bentley cars were built with comfort in mind, adequate interior space space and design were important to their prestigious customers, these features provide all the requirements for an ideal wedding car.
Famous stars from the 50’s and 60’s were proud to own these cars, as they became a status symbol for the rich and famous, stars such as John Lennon and Mick and Bianca Jaggar owned a Rolls Royce Silver Cloud.

The Rolls Royce Silver Cloud is possible one of the finest wedding cars that you can hire, always in demand due to its sheer presence and stature. There is ample leg room inside and that alone can make it the ideal choice for a wedding car. This car offers supreme luxury and ride comfort and was famed for its reliability and near silent engine.

 

This classic Rolls Royce was the companys last traditional model to be built before the Silver Shadow model of the late 60s. The graceful lines of the Silver Cloud, together with its exceptional ride quality, combine to make this a most elegant car for your special day.

Finished in Porcelain White with Beige leather interior fitted with vanity mirrors and picnic tables in the rear.

 

The chassis was a simple steel box section, welded together and very rigid. Construction retained the traditional split between chassis and body, which facilitated the provision of special bodied versions though in practice the overwhelming majority of cars were delivered with the standard steel body shell, produced by Pressed Steel, and employing light weight aluminium based alloy for the doors, bonnet/hood and boot/trunk lid. (Unibody construction did not feature on Rolls Royce cars until the 1965 launch of the Silver Shadow). The car was 5.38 m (212 in) long, 1.90 m (75 in) wide, and massed 1.95 tonnes. The engine was a 155 hp / 4000 rpm 4.9 L six-cylinder unit with inlet over exhaust valves: twin SU carburettors were added in September 1957. The standard transmission was a four-speed automatic.

 

Brakes were hydraulic and assisted by the Rolls-Royce mechanical servo with 11 in (279.4 mm) drums and suspension was independent coils at the front and semi-elliptic springs at the rear. Twin brake master cylinders were incorporated from April 1956.

Power steering became an option in 1956 along with air conditioning.

A long wheel base version, lengthened by 4 in (101.6 mm), was also made available in September 1957, outwardly very similar to the existing car, but offering improved leg space for rear seat passengers.

The British Motor magazine tested a standard wheel base factory bodied Series I in 1956 recording a top speed of 102.9 mph (165.6 km/h) and acceleration from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 13.5 seconds and a fuel consumption of 14.5 miles per imperial gallon (19.5 L/100 km; 12.1 mpg-US).

 

The test car cost £5078 including taxes.

 

The Silver Cloud II was introduced in 1959. Little changed externally but it now had a 6.2 L V8 engine, which pushed the weight to 2.11 tonnes. Performance was greatly improved and top speed was raised to 183 km/h (114 mph), but the main improvements were in acceleration and torque. Power steering became standard. Electrically operated windows were now available as an option.

Although the improved performance of the new car was welcomed, commentators of the time noted that the V8 engined Silver Cloud II was neither as quiet nor as smooth as the straight-six cylinder engined Silver Cloud I, despite the new engine's hydraulic tappet operation. The new wet-linered V8 was also a little cramped in an engine bay intended originally for a narrower unit: in order to change the sparking plugs it was necessary to remove the front wheel on the car's right side. There seems to have been a problem with crankshaft breakages in the earlier V8s: this was blamed on lack of lubrication to the bearings.

The basic architecture of the Silver Cloud II did not change between 1959 and 1963, but there were numerous minor changes implemented, notable among them a succession of improvements to the ventilation system. Interior changes in 1961 included the adoption of blue instrument lighting, the introduction of a combined indictator / headlamp flasher switch and of a handbrake warming light. A remodelled rear light assembly was introduced in May 1962 and a change to sealed-beam (still at this stage single) headlamps was made in August 1962.

The Motor magazine tested a Series II in 1960. They recorded a top speed of 104.7 mph (168.5 km/h), acceleration from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 10.9 seconds and a fuel consumption of 13 miles per imperial gallon (22 L/100 km; 11 mpg-US). The test car cost £6092 including taxes.